How to adjust amplifier gain

how to adjust amplifier gain

Jun 08,  · How to Tune and Adjust Amplifier Gains and Bass Boost Step 1: Setting Volume and Gain Control With your sound system off, disconnect the RCA cables that run to your Step 2: Tuning Frequencies Time to adjust the built-in crossovers on the amplifiers in your system. Most subwoofer Step 3: Bass. Apr 02,  · Engage the high-pass filter of the amplifier's front channels and adjust it so the bass notes disappear. Fade the receiver to the rear speakers only and engage and adjust the rear channels' high-pass filter until the bass disappears there too. Return your receiver's fade control to .

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For Tech Support, call I belong to a culture of fine sights and sounds, and I like spreading the word. I've been tinkering with electronics ever since I was a kid - starting with taking apart and putting back together televisions and radios.

I always got them back together again and working. I took courses in radio how to adjust amplifier gain electronics as a teenager, and became a ham radio operator.

I worked in my high school's stage crew, running sound, lights, and a movie projector. After college, I joined a rock 'n roll band as the soundman and learned how to lug around and operate the gear that helps make music sound good and loud.

Working in a music store in Austin, Texas, I spent a few years manufacturing, installing, repairing, and operating sound systems. Our customers were recording studios, nightclubs, and touring bands. Eventually I moved back to How to make xbox games compatible with xbox 360, Virginia and opened a small demo recording studio.

InI finally came to my senses and got this job at Crutchfield. They actually pay me to ramble on, rant, and explain the things I love about music, electronics, and getting good sound.

Given my background, they put me to work writing about some what is in armour potted meat the most complex what type of brake fluid products Crutchfield sells: car amplifiers, digital signal processors, wiring, professional sound mixers, and PA systems.

Rockford Fosgate What is the best website to sell photos TX4ad 4-channel amplifier. Adding a 4-channel amp to your car stereo system — two channels to run the front speakers and two channels to run the rear speakers — not only raises the sound level, but also greatly increases the sound quality of your music.

This is how I'd tune it up:. Thanks guys for leaving this guide. I how to adjust amplifier gain to do the installs myself, hard to find someone to just do the tune. I followed these directions and have much better performance first try. Now that I know what to do, I'll keep tweaking. I have a simple question that I am having a time finding an answer, I have a what do you shave your balls with x2 and I am running it to 2 Fosgate T's.

I have a 12" P3 sub for my bass I know the 6x9's can handle a little bass, but I get plenty of bass from my 12" sub, I mainly want to get good mid and highs from my 6x9's.

The JVC amp has a 4-channel high-level input, which I am using. I have the input mode selector switch set to 4-channel. I have the amp's bass boost set to max 18db and it's okay but it really should be way too much bass at that setting. Is this setup simply not going to have crazy window-rattling bass? If so, why? Is it because it is only a 4-chan high-level speaker input? What is the fader button? And input level buttons do?? Also i have the kicker cxa Hello i just had installed a kicker My old stock speakers had more bass lol on my amp what do i need to do im confused thank you.

Buck, thank you for the response. My last question when setting gains has to do with whether or not the vehicle Motorcycle in my case should be running or the ignition in ACC. I have read a how to adjust amplifier gain of posts that say the gains can be set with the ignition in ACC initially but to dial them in it should be running. I believe the reason for it running might be voltage drops?

I can't recall. Thank you. You recommend fading to the front and rear channels separately when setting gains but everything I have read says to keep it balanced.

To me, it makes sense to isolate each channel. I am setting them on a Harley bagger, 4ch. Please advise why you would fade when setting gains. I have a old pioneer avic how to adjust amplifier gain HU, running factory bose speakers in my avalanche, i hooked a rockford fosgate punch a2 to it for a w 4ohm speaker.

My HU also has a pair of subwoofer wires coming out also, do i hook up to those instead of the HU rca outputs for the subs or am i missing something. What if your receiver doesn't distort when all the way up and gain all the way down?

I have a pac lp and just bought the Rockford Fosgate M from Crutchfield. How do I adjust the gain on the Pac Lp and the the Amp? Where do you start? I would think you want the amp to be the main adjuster? Can you clear this up for me? Everything I read says to set gains with all filter off, but I came across 1 article that said to set the HPF on and crossover frequency between andthen turn up head unit volume to just below distortion and then turn gain up to just below distortion.

So now I am confused as to keep the HPF off for initial gain setting or not, and what the reasoning is. Very interesting article! I am using a 4 channel-amp but it does not have the gain for the subwoofer. The subs are linked to the front speaker with a crossover the car is a BMW 1 series convertible. On the amp, for the front speakers, I can select full or hpf. Which one would be best to get some bass to the subs?

Thank you for your time, Gaetan. Hello team, Thank you for your tutorial. After reading your reviews on them, I just had to have them. They really are nice. I have my EQ set to flat and no boosters from the stereo. The speakers sound really good, but I'm not really getting any bass from the 6X9's. I've spent a ton of time trying to tune them so that they sound good all the way around.

The subs that I'm using sound awesome, but How to adjust amplifier gain actually turning those off so I can try to get the best sound out of the components. I don't really have any depth, I hear very clear highs, but for some reason I cant get these four speakers to sound "great".

I have the amps setting on "High Pass" for the front and the rear. I tried putting the rear on "Full" but it seems like too much bass going to them to get clear sound. Of course my car stereo only has 1 EQ that controls the front and the back so. How can I leave the rear on "Full" The front on "High" and still get good sound.

I'm kinda going nuts trying to figure it out. Could you please tell me how I'm supposed to have this particular group of hardware setup to work well together. What the best way to setup the amp is and possibly a little help with the stereo to get it sounding good? I would really appreciate it. Please, if you can email me??? Thank you so much. One amp for tweeters and midranges and the other for mid bass and bridged amp. I the rear channels how to adjust amplifier gain 2 4 ohm 10 inch subs.

It sounds great but I don't know if I have the gains set to optimize the amp. The subs are not wired together. Should I use 3 channels and wire my subs together? How do you set the gain on a bridged amplifier, since now your combining to two channels to make one? Is this how to adjust amplifier gain best process to tune a new system that has one 4-channel amp going to the front and rear doors plus a mono amp powering one sub box?

Thank you Mr. Buck for this short and detailed tutoriali have seen many videos on youtube on how to tune the amplifiers for speakers and subs but some of them are toooo long and boring and some are too short and doesnt explain anythingi always come here for research and always find answers. Best regards. Can't find your exact vehicle? How much power and how many channels do your car speakers need? This guide will help you choose the right amplifier for your car's sound system.

Check out this overview of a typical installation to see the steps involved when you install an amplifier in your vehicle. Where should I mount it? What wiring do I need? What size fuse and power wire? These wiring diagrams illustrate how amplifiers connect to your audio system, which will make it easier to shop for the gear you need for the system of your dreams. Car amplifier audio terms - like watts, volts, and efficiency - are explained.

Meet Buck Pomerantz

Estimated wait for next available agent :. All of our representatives are currently chatting with other customers. For Tech Support, call I belong to a culture of fine sights and sounds, and I like spreading the word. I've been tinkering with electronics ever since I was a kid - starting with taking apart and putting back together televisions and radios.

I always got them back together again and working. I took courses in radio and electronics as a teenager, and became a ham radio operator. I worked in my high school's stage crew, running sound, lights, and a movie projector. After college, I joined a rock 'n roll band as the soundman and learned how to lug around and operate the gear that helps make music sound good and loud. Working in a music store in Austin, Texas, I spent a few years manufacturing, installing, repairing, and operating sound systems.

Our customers were recording studios, nightclubs, and touring bands. Eventually I moved back to Charlottesville, Virginia and opened a small demo recording studio. In , I finally came to my senses and got this job at Crutchfield. They actually pay me to ramble on, rant, and explain the things I love about music, electronics, and getting good sound. Given my background, they put me to work writing about some of the most complex electronic products Crutchfield sells: car amplifiers, digital signal processors, wiring, professional sound mixers, and PA systems.

There're quite a few ways to set gain, but I think listening to test tones is the simplest method giving the best results. Continue reading the article if you want to see how I came to this conclusion by my researching the issue in the Crutchfield Labs.

Most manufacturers recommend playing familiar music with the amp gain low, raising the receiver's volume until the music distorts, then backing it off until the music sounds clean again. Next, you turn up the amp's gain until you hear the distortion again, then back it off slightly, and you're done.

For a more detailed explanation, see my article about Tuning your subwoofers. The other methods of setting gain involve using test tones. A test tone is a single note played at a specific frequency, and is typically found on a level-setting disc, but can also be found online for downloading.

In the Crutchfield Labs, I ran a set of tests and determined that "doing it by ear and music" works, but not quite as accurately or scientifically as using test tones. Each tone creates a reference-level 0 dB sine wave that you can observe on an oscilloscope screen.

Instead of listening for distortion in music. As you adjust the volume and gain, you can see exactly at what point the signal of each frequency distorts and where it plays clean. A non-distorted sine wave test tone sounds like a pure hum. When it distorts, you can clearly hear it buzz. I went into The Crutchfield Labs and set up an amplifier, wired to a power supply, a car receiver, and a pair of speakers.

I also attached two sets of probes to a pair of speaker wires, one going to a voltage meter and the other to an oscilloscope. This way, we could see what the sounds look like and read the resulting power level the amp produced. This is so the gain would be set under real-world conditions. Adding boost, at any frequency, after setting the gain, can make the amp clip, distorting the sound and endangering speakers and subs.

That meant certain frequencies would play louder than others. I needed to find out which tone clipped the receiver first, at the lowest volume setting. I played the first tone, 40 Hz, a low bass note, only fit for subwoofers, and set the scope to view the sine wave. But I could see exactly at what volume level the distortion first appeared, and where it disappeared. That meant the receiver played 40 Hz clean and at its loudest at its "52" volume. The Hz tone stood out as the strongest — I had to turn the volume to its lowest setting to get it to play clean.

Because the Hz tone was the strongest, and would clip the amp first, I used the Hz test tone to set the amp's gain. Any waveform distortion I then saw came from the amp, not the receiver. Turning the gain back down until the distortion disappeared, I set the gain exactly where the amp and receiver were both at their maximum clean output levels: perfectly gain-matched.

The volt meter read AC alternating current voltage, and the amp I used a Sound Ordnance M 4-channel showed a top clean output for Hz of That translated to about 77 watts. Not bad for an amp rated at 50 watts RMS per channel. What was going on was the power supply the receiver and amp used was That explained some of the "extra" power.

But the amp definitely performed above its specified rating. I want to say, in advance, that this was not a pleasant experience. Two hours later, my ears were still painfully ringing from the very high 8K Hz tone. Jordan, also in the Labs area at the time, complained that the 4K Hz tone was still ringing in his. This method can produce high-pitched, annoying, ear-drilling sounds that could hurt your hearing if you expose yourself for too long, and definitely will bother everyone within listening distance.

They don't hurt at all. The Hz tone alone will do for both subwoofer and full-range speaker amps. A sine wave sounds like a hum. Again, the Hz tone was the first to buzz, and at the exact same 51 volume setting. Then I backed it off until the hum alone remained. The place the gain knob was set and the voltage readings were exactly the same as it had been using the scope.

I did this test after working hours so no one else would be disturbed. But I proved to myself, at least, that the ear-and-tone method worked just as well and as accurately as using a scope. The 40 Hz tone couldn't really be reproduced by the speakers, so was useless. The Hz tone rattled everything on the desk, so it was a little difficult to pick the buzz-point out of the crowd of reverberations.

The Hz tone was the best tone to detect clip-points, with a very clearly defined hum-to-buzz point. Finally, I tried music and my ears alone.

I performed this test twice, days apart, and also afterhours. Not everyone wants to hear my songs played loudly over and over again. So I switched to a clear-voiced female vocalist singing swing. I turned it up until I heard something go wrong with the vocal — it seemed thinner, not as bell-like, and harsher.

The male singer's voice suddenly developed a rasp. The two times I did this test, I got two different results. The first time, the receiver's maximum volume setting ended up one notch below the tones and scope setting. The second time, it was one notch higher than the tones and scope setting. But both times, the amp gain setting was exactly the same as the other methods.

On the first day, setting it by ear and music alone, I ended up thinking I should never turn the receiver higher than 50, and the gain was set so that at that 50 volume, the amp put out On the second day, it ended up that I could turn it up to 52, and get That Hz tone was indeed slightly distorted visually, but it wasn't audible in the music.

Plus, I don't usually listen to music full-blast for very long periods of time, so in real use, I would likely never be able to hear the difference. I certainly cranked some swing those evenings in the Crutchfield Lab. Whatever the differences between the methods were, they all resulted in having the receiver and amp properly gain-matched, and loud, distortion-free music ensued.

Using the test tones disc was easier than listening to music. It was very easy to discern when the hum distorted into a buzz. Hello Buck , i liked this article. I just upgraded my shop stereo.

Now I will calibrate this tommorrow maybe? My theory is to with no speakers1. Play a 50 Hz tone to my Audiobahn to set the input level. Here's where I feel like I am going into the Unknown The sub woofers give me a 4 Ohm load combined. Does this seem sound to you Sir?

Thank You for any advice You can offer. When level matching the amp to the hard unit do you leave the seating on the head to 0 Tribble bass. I used 1K Hz and 40 Hz test tones to adjust my gains and when I'm listening to my music I still hear my speakers crackle and my speakers buzz, but if I turn on my headlights to turns into a hum noise.

Is simply rotating the gain knob to the voltage location that matches the head unit output voltage an accurate way to set it? How do you prevent the other speakers in the car from not playing the test tone?

It seems like they would just be going crazy as you do the test to set the gain, any way to mitigate this? When tuning the amps do you have the filters off? Or put them on after you do the gain settings with the sine waves? I have a Jeep Wrangler with a Pioneer nex I plan on using the tones recommended and finding the highest volume possible without clipping on the 4 speakers the Jeep brings with no amp.

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